The Friday Five (x 3): Days Of The Week

Got an email from my brother Pat this morning (I’m writing this Thursday):

Had a revelation while in this heavy work travel period that you should do a Friday Five with song titles including days of the week! Inspired by my shuffle that just played Another Park, Another Sunday by the Doobie Brothers. Perhaps you’ve done before, but, if not, happy searching….give me credit for that song though 😉

I’m glad he wrote, because in all the pre-A to Z Challenge confusion I realized I hadn’t written a post for today. So this was a good break, and when I got started with the songs I couldn’t stop, at least until I had fifteen, including Pat’s. There are so many, I built a playlist, which runs close to an hour. Hey, when I get going, sometimes I have trouble stopping…

  1. Another Park, Another Sunday – The Doobie Brothers Pat’s original idea, from 1974’s What Were Once Vices Are Now Habits. This was the first single from the album, and while it only reached #32, it was played a lot on FM radio. Most people probably bought the album.
  2. Monday, Monday – The Mamas And The Papas Written by John Phillips in 1966, it was their only #1 hit.
  3. Saturday In the Park – Chicago From Chicago V, the song reached #3 nationally and spent several weeks at #1 in Chicago. It made the album a million-seller.
  4. Friday I’m In Love – The Cure The second single from their 1992 album Wish, it reached #18 on the Hot 100 and #1 on Billboard‘s Hot Modern Rock Tracks list.
  5. I Don’t Like Mondays – The Boomtown Rats This song by Bob Geldof only reached #73 on the Hot 100 and #84 on the Cash Box survey, but spent four weeks at the top of the UK charts in 1979.
  6. Stormy Monday Blues – Junior Wells With Buddy Guy A classic blues number, this is the first version I heard and still my favorite.
  7. Another Saturday Night – Sam Cooke From 1963, it reached #10 on the Hot 100 and spent a week at #1 on the R&B chart. Cat Stevens’s version from 1974 reached #6 on the Hot 100.
  8. Come Saturday Morning – The Sandpipers I always liked this one; it was the title track from their 1970 album and reached #17 on the Hot 100. A different version was in the movie The Sterile Cuckoo.
  9. Pleasant Valley Sunday – The Monkees Gerry Goffin and Carole King wrote this one, and The Monkees recorded it in 1967. It reached #2 on the Hot 100 that year.
  10. Manic Monday – The Bangles This one was written by Prince under the pseudonym “Christopher” and was on The Bangles’ second studio album, 1986’s Different Light. It reached #2 on the Hot 100.
  11. Rainy Days and Mondays – The Carpenters Karen and Richard released this in 1971 and it reached #2 on the Hot 100 and Cash Box survey, as well as being their fourth #1 on the Easy Listening chart. Like I said, they were a hit machine in the early Seventies.
  12. Ruby Tuesday – The Rolling Stones This was a double-sided single with “Let’s Spend The Night Together” and reached #1 in 1967, as well as providing a name for a chain of restaurants.
  13. Saturday Night’s Alright For Fighting – Elton John It’s Sir Elton’s birthday tomorrow. This was the first single off of 1973’s Goodbye Yellow Brick Road, and only reached #12 on the Hot 100, but it’s one of his better-known songs and I remember it being on the radio all the time.
  14. Black Friday – Steely Dan The first single off of 1975’s Katy Lied, it rose to #37.
  15. Sunday Will Nver Be The Same – Spanky and Our Gang From their eponymous 1967 album, this rose to #9 and was their first charting single.

Anyway, thank you, Pat! And believe me, there are plenty more songs with days of the week in the title. If you come up with one or more of them, leave me a comment, and we’ll see if we can get it on the air. That’s The Friday Five (x 3) for March 24, 2017.

Writer’s Workshop: Want A Challenge For Next Month?

I don’t know whether Kat had intended this to be an opportunity to talk about the Blogging from A to Z April Challenge, but she came up with the prompt and I don’t think she’ll mind me telling you all about it.

a2z2017

I started blogging in 2012, and one of the reasons I started blogging was so I could take part in the many challenges and blog hops that are held through the year, such as Mama Kat’s Pretty Much World Famous Writer’s Workshop. The challenge that caught my eye and made me say, “Yes! I really want to start blogging!” was the A to Z Challenge. I participated that year and have done so every year since, and have been a co-host for the Challenge since 2015. It’s become the highlight of my blogging year.

Arlee Bird, who runs the blog Tossing It Out, was the person who started the Challenge. In 2011, he said “I’m going to blog every day except Sunday, starting on April 1 with a word that starts with ‘A’ and continue through the alphabet each day in April except Sundays until I reach the letter ‘Z’ on April 30.” That first year, other bloggers who know Arlee decided to do it with him. And, as with most of these blog hops, other people saw what they were doing, and before long we had over 1000 people doing A to Z during April.

We started using a Linky to keep track of everyone doing the Challenge, so that people could go out to the list and choose a bunch of blogs to read and perhaps follow during the challenge, and used that up through the current year. This year we’re doing things a little differently, dispensing with the Linky and instead having people check in at the Challenge blog on a daily basis and post the link to their latest entry as a comment to the daily post there. It became a headache riding herd on everyone on the list, some of whom put their name on it only to not do the challenge, others who started out doing the challenge only to quit part of the way through, and there was no way for a person to join in the middle, which does happen.

Most, but not all, of the people who do the challenge choose a theme for their blog posts during the month. Last year, for example, I used portmanteau words as my theme. Other people have used the month to write a novella, write a daily flash fiction or poem, or to do “The A to Z of ______________,” something they’re knowledgable in. Anything’s fair game.

The advantages of doing the Challenge:

  • You find all kinds of new blogs and new bloggers to follow.
  • Likewise, lots of other bloggers find you and start following you.
  • If you’ve thought of stepping up your blogging, preparing 26 articles to post one per day is a great way to start.
  • It teaches you problem solving. On the 24th day of the challenge, you have to find a word that starts with X. Tha’s when you figure out X is the Roman numeral for “ten,” and that X in Greek is the letter “chi.”
  • It is a lot of fun. A lot of work, but a lot of fun anyway.

Sound like something you’d like to do? If so, we’d love to have you along for the ride. If not, there’ll still be lots of blogs participating this year for you to read and follow. Many bloggers will post their articles on Facebook and Twitter using the hashtag #atozchallenge. Give it a try!

BATTLE OF THE BANDS: “Air Mail Special” Results

BATTLE OF THE BANDS! (BOTB Top Photo)

This battle was no contest:

Caterina Valente: 0
Doc Severinsen and the Tonight Show Band: 9

Well, sometimes you try something different, and sometimes it works, amnd sometimes it doesn’t. In this case, pairing a scat singer up against a big band, particularly a popular one, was probably not the best idea. So, congratulations to Doc and the Band, and best wishes to Caterina.

The next battle will be April 1, also the first day of the A to Z Challenge. See you then!

Two for Tuesday: The Stylistics

Soul and rhythm & blues played a big part of the sounds of the early Seventies, and while many of the best hits never crossed over to Top 40 radio, there were many that did. One of the groups that did well as crossover artists was The Stylistics, who had five songs in the top 10 on the Hot 100, spending a total of 22 weeks there. On the R&B chart, they had twelve straight top 10 singles. In neither case did they have any #1 hits. Kind of a surprise, because they were one of the better vocal groups out of Philadelphia, featuring the falsetto of Russell Tompkins, Jr. and Thom Bell’s production.

The song that did the best on the Pop chart was “You Make Me Feel Brand New,” which went to #2, as well as #5 on the R&B chart, in 1974.

Their second best-selling single on the Pop chart was “Betcha By Golly Wow,” which reached #3, and #2 on the R&B chart, in 1972.

The Stylistics, your Two for Tuesday, March 21, 2017.