#1LinerWeds from Julia Cameron #JusJoJan

Mary found this on Facebook and passed it along. If you’ve read The Artist’s Way, you know Julia Cameron says things like this a lot.


One-Liner Wednesday is brought to you each week by Linda Hill and this station. During January, it’s also part of the Just Jot It January blogfest, which ends today, and many thanks to Linda for hosting it. Now a word about Pure gasoline. Be sure with Pure!

We still have a Pure station here in the Atlanta area, and I’m sure there are others.

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Author: John Holton

I'm a writer and blogger who writes and blogs about things that interest me.

19 thoughts on “#1LinerWeds from Julia Cameron #JusJoJan”

    1. The comedian Sinbad wrote a book years ago called “Sinbad’s Guide To Life (because I know everything).” He explains in the first chapter that he knows everything because he’s screwed everything up moe than once. Along the same lines, Scott Adams explained in “The Dilbert Principle” that companies would do much better to ask an employee who’s screwed something up what he learned from the experience, rather than chewing the guy out. Really, you learn nothing by getting it right the first time. When I was in Physical Therapy after my stroke, I surprised myself and my therapists by walking a considerable difference with a cane one afternoon. Of course, I didn’t do it again for almost a week afterward…

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    1. That’s true for most of us. Malcolm Gladwell says that it takes 10,000 hours of practice to get really good at something (that’s 1.15 years if you do nothing but practice 24×7). At 2 hours a day, that’s over 13 years. You could add more hours per day, but there would come a point at which adding more hours might be more of a detriment. I think Gladwell pulled that number out of his rear end…

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  1. That Julia Cameron quote (whoever she is) reminded me of something I used to say back in the… uhm… late 1970s? Early ’80s?

    “An artist’s mistakes are half of his art.”

    Because I figured the mistakes were literally a part of the process leading to the final result. Without them, the adjustments would not have been made and the end result would not have been the same.

    But then again, I always had a lot of weird internal dialogue going on in my headbone.

    ~ D-FensDogG
    ‘Loyal American Underground’

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    1. Kind of like we used to say in the software biz: “It’s not a bug, it’s a feature!”

      You can take just about any work of art — a painting, sculpture, book, song, etc. — and realize the finished product is the product of multiple modifications to what the artist did first and decided to change. So your weird internal dialogue was spot on, actually…

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