Monday’s Music Moves Me: Traveling Songs

Guess who got to pick the theme for today? The letter of the day for the A to Z Challenge is T, so I picked a theme that started with that letter: traveling songs. Here are a few I came up with.

Elvin Bishop, “Travelin’ Shoes” Elvin Bishop was one of the original members of the Butterfield Blues Band who left in the late Sixties to front his own band, The Elvin Bishop Group.

Canned Heat, “On The Road Again” Canned Heat were a Southern California band that started out doing a lot of blues. Both founders, vocalist Bob “The Bear” Hite and guitarist/harmonicist/vocalist Alan “Blind Owl” Wilson, were avid blues fans. Blind Owl sings this, which rose to #16 on the Hot 100 in 1969.

Vanity Fare, “Hitchin’ A Ride” A British band, they had their greatest success with this song, which reached #5 on the Hot 100 and #3 in Canada in 1970.

The Grateful Dead, “Truckin'” I kind of blow hot and cold on The Grateful Dead. They were really popular in the Sixties and Seventies, which might be attributed to the chemically-induced mental state of the fans. They were never much for the Hot 100, although this song spent eight weeks on the Singles chart, reaching #64. It’s from their 1969 album American Beauty.

Wes Montgomery, “Road Song” To watch Wes Montgomery play, you’d think he didn’t know what he was doing, but when you heard him, you realized he was one of the greatest jazz guitarists of the post-bop era. After years recording for Riverside and Verve, two jazz labels, he signed with Herb Alpert’s A&M Records and adopted a more commercial sound. Hardcore jazz fans questioned the move without noticing that he recorded some great music for A&M, including this, the title track from his third and last album for the label, recorded shortly before his death in 1968.

So there are a couple of traveling songs. Can you think of others? There are a ton of them out there.

Monday’s Music Moves Me is sponsored by X-Mas Dolly, Callie, Cathy, and Stacy, so be sure and visit them, where you can also find the Linky for the other participants.


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Monday’s Music Moves Me: Songs About Bees

We had a new front porch and stairs put on the house last summer. The other day, I walked out the door and found sawdust on the stairs, a sure sign that carpenter bees are chewing their way into the new porch. We found some spray, and learned online that the trick is to shoot Sevin dust into the holes. If anyone has any suggestions on how to get rid of them, please let me know in the comments.

Anyway, I decided to share some songs about bees.

Slim Harpo, “King Bee” Slim Harpo is probably best known fo the song “Scratch My Back,” but he was a bona fide blues guitarist, harmonicist, and singer. This is a classic blues number

Blake Shelton, “Honey Bee” I was actually looking for the next song, found this one, and knew I had some country music fans out there, so I included it here.

Muddy Waters, “Honey Bee” Muddy would always get a little wild on the slide guitar on this one, and it seemed the older he got, the wilder he got. But it always sounded good.

Al Hirt, “Green Bee” This song and the next are arrangements of Rimsky-Korsakov’s “Flight of the Bumblebee.” It was used as the original theme for the radio show The Green Hornet as well as in the serials, so naturally, when the show moved to TV, they licensed the rights for it and gave the job of playing it to trumpeter extraordinaire Al Hirt. Al released the song as “Green Bee” on his 1966 album The Horn Meets “The Hornet”. That’s Van Williams with Al on the album jacket.

Liberace, “Bumble Boogie” Say what you will about Liberace, he could play the piano. “Bumble Boogie” was a hit for B. Bumble and The Stingers in 1961, but the song goes back to 1946, when pianist Jack Fina played it with Freddy Martin and His Orchestra. Given the age of the clip, Lee’s version was sometime in between.

And that’s Monday’s Music Moves Me for April 17, 2017.

Monday’s Music Moves Me is sponsored by X-Mas Dolly, Callie, Cathy, and Stacy, so be sure and visit them, where you can also find the Linky for the other participants.


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Monday’s Music Move Me: Grammy Winners from 1974

The theme for this week, “tunes from the Grammys the year you turned 18,” confused me. I turned 18 in 1974; did the person who gave the prompt want songs from the Grammy Awards ceremony held in 1974 (which honored the best records from 1973), or the songs from 1974 that were honored at the Grammy Awards ceremony in 1975? I decided the answer was “yes,” so here are three songs each from both years

From the 1974 Grammy Awards ceremony:

Roberta Flack, “Killing Me Softly With His Song” This won Record of the Year for Roberta Flack and producer Joel Dorn and Song of the Year for Charles Fox and Norman Gimbel, who wrote it.

Charlie Rich, “Behind Closed Doors” The Silver Fox took the Grammy for Best Country Vocal Performance, Male.

Eumir Deodato, “Also Sprach Zarathustra” Deodato took home the Grammy for Best Pop Instrumental Performance.

And from 1975:

Olivia Newton-John, “I Honestly Love You” The lovely Olivia and her producer, John Farrar, took the Grammy for Record of the Year, and this song also won a Grammy for Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female.

Mike Oldfield, “Tubular Bells (Theme From The Exorcist)” Mike Oldfield won the Grammy for Best Instrumental Composition. This is only a portion of the full Tubular Bells, which itself is a pretty outstanding record.

Marvin Hamlisch, “The Entertainer” Hamlisch was the big winner in 1975, winning with this for Best Pop Instrumental Performance. He also won, with Alan and Marilyn Bergman, Song of the Year for “The Way We Were,” again with the Bergmans for Album of Best Original Score Written for a Motion Picture or Television Special for The Way We Were, and took home the trophy for Best New Artist. Way to go, Marvin!

And that’s Monday’s Music Moves Me for April 10, 2017.

Monday’s Music Moves Me is sponsored by X-Mas Dolly, Callie, Cathy, and Stacy, so be sure and visit them, where you can also find the Linky for the other participants.


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Monday’s Music Moves Me: Top Five from WLS, April 3, 1982

Back with more survey madness, since it’s a freebie week and I have a ton of blogs to read today. I just love the A to Z Challenge, don’t you?

Oldiesloon’s collection of surveys from WLS stops at the end of 1982. I can’t remember if they stopped issuing a survey or if surveys for later years aren’t available to them. The station moved more in the direction of Hot Adult Contemporary by the middle of the decade and in 1989 stopped playing music altogether. Anyway, here’s what Chicago was listening to on Musicradio WLS 35 years ago today.

#5 – Journey, “Open Arms” A beautiful song, this was Journey’s biggest single, reaching #2 nationally. It only got to #4 in Chicago and was on its way back down the charts.

#4 – Buckner & Garcia, “Pac Man Fever” Remember how crazy everyone was about Pac-Man? Buckner and Garcia came up with this to capitalize on that popularity. It only made it to #9 nationally.

#3 – J. Geils Band, “Centerfold” The J. Geils Band had come up as a blues-rock sextet in the early Seventies, driven by “Magic Dick” Salwitz’s harmonica and Peter Wolf’s vocals, but had moved more to pop music and greater commercial appeal by the Eighties. This peaked at #1 in Chicago and nationally.

#2 – The Go-Gos, “We Got The Beat” This was the theme song for the Atlanta Beat, a women’s professional soccer team. The Go-Gos also held the #6 spot in the chart with “Our Lips Are Sealed.” It peaked at #2 nationally and in Chicago.

#1 – Joan Jett & The Blackhearts, “I Love Rock & Roll” This song kept practically every song this week from reaching #1, spending a total of eight weeks at #1 (this was its fourth) in Chicago and seven weeks overall.

So that’s what we were listening to in Chicago on this day in 1982. That’s Monday’s Music Moves Me for April 3, 2017.

Monday’s Music Moves Me is sponsored by X-Mas Dolly, Callie, Cathy, and Stacy, so be sure and visit them, where you can also find the Linky for the other participants.


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Monday’s Music Moves Me: Themes From Irwin Allen Shows and Movies

I realize this is later than usual… I ran out of time yesterday before I got the chance to write this entry, then I had to be an adult and do the taxes and follow up on an insurance problem today. Then, after lunch, I sat down to watch Bonanza on MeTV, only to learn, much to my chagrin, that we no longer receive MeTV: it moved to a station outside the Atlanta area at 9 AM this morning. Where or when it will return, I don’t know; all I know is that we now have Escape on two different channels.

One of the things I’ll miss, at least until we get MeTV back, is their late-night sci-fi programs that run after 1 AM on Saturday night/Sunday morning. It’s then that they run the Irwin Allen-produced sci-fi programs from the Sixties. All of the themes but one in today’s MMMM were written by John (or, as he was known in the Sixties, Johnny) Williams. Williams and Allen had a working relationship not unlike that of Henry Mancini and Blake Edwards.

Land Of The Giants

The Time Tunnel

Voyage To The Bottom Of The Sea Theme music by Paul Sawtell

Lost In Space

Allen went on to produce disaster movies such as The Poseidon Adventure and The Towering Inferno. Not exactly sci-fi, but I’m on a roll.

The Towering Inferno

The Poseidon Adventure

And that’s Monday’s Music Moves Me for March 27, 2017.

Monday’s Music Moves Me is sponsored by X-Mas Dolly, Callie, Cathy, and Stacy, so be sure and visit them, where you can also find the Linky for the other participants.


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