Monday’s Music Moves Me: “Diamond” Songs

I’m sure someone has already done this as a theme. Still, these are great songs, and I’m sure you can think of more. Here are some songs with the word “diamond” in the title.

  1. Seals and Crofts, “Diamond Girl” The title track from their 1973 album. It rose to #6 on the Hot 100 and #4 on the Easy Listening chart that year, and was #40 for the year.
  2. Gary Lewis and The Playboys, “This Diamond Ring” Written by Al Kooper with Bob Brass and Irwin Levine in 1965. It eventually reached #1 on the Hot 100 in 1965.
  3. Shirley Bassey, “Diamonds Are Forever” The title track for the 1971 James Bond film. It was Dame Shirley’s second Bond theme song, the first of course being “Goldfinger.” It reached #57 on the Hot 100 and #14 on the Adult Contemporary chart in 1972.
  4. The Beatles, “Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds” Some clever person who hated The Beatles pointed out that the initials for this were LSD, but according to John Lennon, it was the title of a drawing that Julian had done. It appeared on 1967’s Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, in a slightly more finished form than we have here.
  5. Marilyn Monroe, “Diamonds Are A Girl’s Best Friend” From the iconic 1953 film Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, which starred MM and Jane Russell. Madonna “borrowed” the idea for the set and her dress for her 1985 video for “Material Girl.”
  6. David Bowie, “Diamond Dogs” The tite track from his 1974 album, which was the swan song for David’s Ziggy Stardust character. It was released as a single in the US, but failed to chart.

As always, I’ll take your suggestions for other “diamond” songs, and play your selections this Friday, if I get enough. That’s Monday’s Music Moves Me for May 22, 2017.

Monday’s Music Moves Me is sponsored by X-Mas Dolly, Callie, Cathy, and Stacy, so be sure and visit them, where you can also find the Linky for the other participants.


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Monday’s Music Moves Me: Happy Birthday!

We’re tasked with finding artists who were born on May 8 and thus having a birthday. The Blogger’s Best Friend tells us these musical artists are having a birthday today, so…

Happy 77th to Toni Tennille, born this day in 1940. Here’s “Do That To Me One More Time” from 1979.

Happy 76th to John Fred, born this day in 1941. A one-hit wonder! Here’s John & His Playboy Band with “Judy In Disguise (With Glasses)” from 1968.

Happy heavenly birthday to singer and TV actor Rick(y) Nelson, born this day in 1940. Here he is with “Hello Mary Lou,” from 1961, featuring the James Burton solo that made hundreds of kids want to play the guitar.

Happy 73rd to Gary Glitter! Here’s “Rock & Roll (Part 2)” from 1972.

And happy 66th to Philip Bailey, drummer with Earth wind & Fire, who had a huge hit with Phil Collins in 1984, “Easy Lover.”

Finally, a happy heavenly birthday to the lovely Miyoshi Umeki, born this day in 1929. Here’s “Sayonara,” from 1953.

And happy birthday to you, if today is your birthday. That’s Monday’s Music Moves Me for May 8, 2017.

Monday’s Music Moves Me is sponsored by X-Mas Dolly, Callie, Cathy, and Stacy, so be sure and visit them, where you can also find the Linky for the other participants.


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Monday’s Music Moves Me: Traveling Songs

Guess who got to pick the theme for today? The letter of the day for the A to Z Challenge is T, so I picked a theme that started with that letter: traveling songs. Here are a few I came up with.

Elvin Bishop, “Travelin’ Shoes” Elvin Bishop was one of the original members of the Butterfield Blues Band who left in the late Sixties to front his own band, The Elvin Bishop Group.

Canned Heat, “On The Road Again” Canned Heat were a Southern California band that started out doing a lot of blues. Both founders, vocalist Bob “The Bear” Hite and guitarist/harmonicist/vocalist Alan “Blind Owl” Wilson, were avid blues fans. Blind Owl sings this, which rose to #16 on the Hot 100 in 1969.

Vanity Fare, “Hitchin’ A Ride” A British band, they had their greatest success with this song, which reached #5 on the Hot 100 and #3 in Canada in 1970.

The Grateful Dead, “Truckin'” I kind of blow hot and cold on The Grateful Dead. They were really popular in the Sixties and Seventies, which might be attributed to the chemically-induced mental state of the fans. They were never much for the Hot 100, although this song spent eight weeks on the Singles chart, reaching #64. It’s from their 1969 album American Beauty.

Wes Montgomery, “Road Song” To watch Wes Montgomery play, you’d think he didn’t know what he was doing, but when you heard him, you realized he was one of the greatest jazz guitarists of the post-bop era. After years recording for Riverside and Verve, two jazz labels, he signed with Herb Alpert’s A&M Records and adopted a more commercial sound. Hardcore jazz fans questioned the move without noticing that he recorded some great music for A&M, including this, the title track from his third and last album for the label, recorded shortly before his death in 1968.

So there are a couple of traveling songs. Can you think of others? There are a ton of them out there.

Monday’s Music Moves Me is sponsored by X-Mas Dolly, Callie, Cathy, and Stacy, so be sure and visit them, where you can also find the Linky for the other participants.


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Monday’s Music Moves Me: Songs About Bees

We had a new front porch and stairs put on the house last summer. The other day, I walked out the door and found sawdust on the stairs, a sure sign that carpenter bees are chewing their way into the new porch. We found some spray, and learned online that the trick is to shoot Sevin dust into the holes. If anyone has any suggestions on how to get rid of them, please let me know in the comments.

Anyway, I decided to share some songs about bees.

Slim Harpo, “King Bee” Slim Harpo is probably best known fo the song “Scratch My Back,” but he was a bona fide blues guitarist, harmonicist, and singer. This is a classic blues number

Blake Shelton, “Honey Bee” I was actually looking for the next song, found this one, and knew I had some country music fans out there, so I included it here.

Muddy Waters, “Honey Bee” Muddy would always get a little wild on the slide guitar on this one, and it seemed the older he got, the wilder he got. But it always sounded good.

Al Hirt, “Green Bee” This song and the next are arrangements of Rimsky-Korsakov’s “Flight of the Bumblebee.” It was used as the original theme for the radio show The Green Hornet as well as in the serials, so naturally, when the show moved to TV, they licensed the rights for it and gave the job of playing it to trumpeter extraordinaire Al Hirt. Al released the song as “Green Bee” on his 1966 album The Horn Meets “The Hornet”. That’s Van Williams with Al on the album jacket.

Liberace, “Bumble Boogie” Say what you will about Liberace, he could play the piano. “Bumble Boogie” was a hit for B. Bumble and The Stingers in 1961, but the song goes back to 1946, when pianist Jack Fina played it with Freddy Martin and His Orchestra. Given the age of the clip, Lee’s version was sometime in between.

And that’s Monday’s Music Moves Me for April 17, 2017.

Monday’s Music Moves Me is sponsored by X-Mas Dolly, Callie, Cathy, and Stacy, so be sure and visit them, where you can also find the Linky for the other participants.


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Monday’s Music Move Me: Grammy Winners from 1974

The theme for this week, “tunes from the Grammys the year you turned 18,” confused me. I turned 18 in 1974; did the person who gave the prompt want songs from the Grammy Awards ceremony held in 1974 (which honored the best records from 1973), or the songs from 1974 that were honored at the Grammy Awards ceremony in 1975? I decided the answer was “yes,” so here are three songs each from both years

From the 1974 Grammy Awards ceremony:

Roberta Flack, “Killing Me Softly With His Song” This won Record of the Year for Roberta Flack and producer Joel Dorn and Song of the Year for Charles Fox and Norman Gimbel, who wrote it.

Charlie Rich, “Behind Closed Doors” The Silver Fox took the Grammy for Best Country Vocal Performance, Male.

Eumir Deodato, “Also Sprach Zarathustra” Deodato took home the Grammy for Best Pop Instrumental Performance.

And from 1975:

Olivia Newton-John, “I Honestly Love You” The lovely Olivia and her producer, John Farrar, took the Grammy for Record of the Year, and this song also won a Grammy for Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female.

Mike Oldfield, “Tubular Bells (Theme From The Exorcist)” Mike Oldfield won the Grammy for Best Instrumental Composition. This is only a portion of the full Tubular Bells, which itself is a pretty outstanding record.

Marvin Hamlisch, “The Entertainer” Hamlisch was the big winner in 1975, winning with this for Best Pop Instrumental Performance. He also won, with Alan and Marilyn Bergman, Song of the Year for “The Way We Were,” again with the Bergmans for Album of Best Original Score Written for a Motion Picture or Television Special for The Way We Were, and took home the trophy for Best New Artist. Way to go, Marvin!

And that’s Monday’s Music Moves Me for April 10, 2017.

Monday’s Music Moves Me is sponsored by X-Mas Dolly, Callie, Cathy, and Stacy, so be sure and visit them, where you can also find the Linky for the other participants.


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