The Friday 5×2: Your “Saint” Songs

I’m impressed: you came up with quite a few songs with “saint” in the title. Eight, plus one with a band that had “saint” in the name. I added a tenth that I remembered, to bring us up to ten. And here they are…

  1. Foo Fighters, “Saint Cecilia” Cathy came up with several suggestions, starting with this one. She had it down as “St. Isabella,” and I could have sworn I had seen that one, but couldn’t find it. It might have been this one, which Jeanne also suggested. It was the title track from their 2015 EP, and reached #3 on the Mainstream Rock chart the following year.
  2. Mötley Crüe, “Saints of Los Angeles” I impress myself sometimes: I got all the umlauts in! Cathy also suggested this. It was the title track from their ninth and final LP from 2008. Helped along by its presence in the video game Rock Band, it reached #5 on the Hot Mainstream Rock chart and was nominated for a Grammy in 2009.
  3. U2 and Green Day, “The Saints Are Coming” Ever since the “free album on iTunes” debacle, U2 has been on my “naughty” list. Also from Cathy, this was originally done by the Scottish punk-rock band Skids on their 1979 debut album Scared To Dance. The cover reached #51 on the Hot 100 in 2006.
  4. Doris Day, “Ol’ Saint Nicholas” Birgit said she remembered a song by either Doris Day or Kate Smith (or both) that had “saint” in the title, and I found this. I know, it’s not Christmastime until after Thanksgiving, but it’s like everyone is starting “the most wonderful time of the year” early, so I added it.
  5. J. S. Bach, “St. Matthew Passion (Final Chorus)” Ed told me he sang this in college, where his choir director used it as a way to teach people who didn’t speak German how to sing it, and that the words, when translated, are beautiful. The whole piece is almost three hours long.
  6. Judas Priest, “Saints In Hell” Jeanne contributed this one. From their 1978 album Stained Class.
  7. Sara Evans, “Saints and Angels” Sandi wasn’t sure if The Waterboys or country singer Sara Evans did this originally. From what I gather, The Waterboys got it from Sara. This was on her 2000 album Born To Fly, and was the third single from it, released in September 2001. It peaked at #16 on the Hot Country Singles chart and at #3 on Billboard’s “Bubbling Under” Hot 100.
  8. Orbital, “The Saint” Jeanne also recommended this theme song from the Sixties TV show The Saint starring a young Roger Moore, who would have made a dynamite James Bond when the show was on. I think he was a bit long-in-the-tooth to play him in the Seventies. I haven’t done a collection of TV Themes in a while. Maybe next week?
  9. St. Paul and The Broken Bones, “Call Me” SDC suggested this one, and while the song title doesn’t have “saint” in it, the band’s name does. They’re a six-piece “blue-eyed soul” band from Birmingham, Alabama, and they’ve released two albums and two EP’s. This is from 2014’s Half The City.
  10. “St. Trinian’s Fight Song” From the British “St. Trinian’s” movies, popular in the Fifties and based on a cartoon of the same name about a girls’ school where the girls are little hellions. Mary and I used to watch them when Channel 11 in Chicago would run them as the late Sunday evening movie. The first, 1954’s The Belles of St. Trinian’s, featured the redoubtable Alistair Sim in dual roles, as the headmistress as well as her bookie brother. They attempted a reboot of the series not long ago, and it was much less innocent and much less successful.

Thanks to all who contributed. That’s your Friday 5×2 for November 3, 2017.

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The Friday 5×2: Your Autumn Songs

You all managed to come up with ten songs about Autumn to go along with the ten I did on Monday, and I’m sure that you’ll come up with even more after we finish here. Here’s your list.

  1. Guns ‘n Roses, “November Rain” My brother Patrick came up with this suggestion, and apologized that it’s a long one. G n’ R released this in 1992 from their Use Your Illusion I album. It climbed all the way to #3 on the Hot 100, making it the longest song ever to break the Top Ten.
  2. Gordon Lightfoot, “The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald” Ed Thierbach had several suggestions for this list. I was always under the impression that the event this song remembers happened a hundred years ago, but it happened in November 1975. Almost exactly a year later, this song reached #1 in Canada, #1 on the Cash Box survey, and #2 (behind Rod Stewart’s “Tonight’s The Night”) on the Hot 100.
  3. Neil Diamond, “September Morn” Another one from Ed. Since they won’t be playing Neil’s “Sweet Caroline” at Red Sox games until next spring, it’s oddly appropriate. It was the title track from Neil’s 1979 album, and his 30th Top 40 single, reaching #17 on the Hot 100, #14 on the Cash Box survey, #7 on the Record World survey, and #1 on the Canadian Adult Contemporary chart.
  4. Jerry Orbach, “Try To Remember” Sandi gave me this suggestion and the next. This is from the 1960 musical The Fantasticks and is sung by the man who first sang it on Broadway, who many of you know as Det. Lenny Briscoe from Law & Order. I like this the best of any version of it.
  5. Robert Goulet, “If Ever I Would Leave You” Sandi’s second suggestion is from the 1960 musical Camelot, written by Lerner & Loewe. Robert Goulet is the first to sing it on Broadway, another man with a fantastic voice.
  6. Justin Hayward, “Forever Autumn” Eugenia thought of this. The song was written by Jeff Wayne, Gary Osborne and Paul Vigrass and was part of Wayne’s musical Musical Version Of The War Of The Worlds.
  7. Basil Poledouris, “Hymn To Red October” Ed came up with this. It was part of the soundtrack for the 1990 film The Hunt For Red October.
  8. Sonny Boy Williamson II, “November Boogie” This was from Dan Antion, who said a blind man who was at his father’s bowling alley heard Dan’s birthday was in November and started playing this one. It was on a 1966 EP with several other songs.
  9. Vivaldi, “Autumn” Birgit went classical on us and took this from Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons. It full name is Concerto No. 3 in F Major, Opus 8, RV 293, “L’Autunno.”
  10. Green Day, “Wake Me Up When September Ends” 15 And Meowing thought of this one, which I wouldn’t have. It was released in 2005 as the fourth single from their 2004 album American Idiot, rose to #6 on the Hot 100, and has been certified platinum.

Thanks to everyone who suggested songs. That’s the Friday 5×2 for October 13, 2017.

Monday’s Music Moves Me: Your “Body Parts” Songs

Last Friday (today as I write this), I gave you ten songs that mentioned body parts in the title and asked for more suggestions. This was not an easy topic, as Kip pointed out, and as of 4 PM Eastern Time on Friday you only came up with eight, so I added two of my favorites at the end. If I get any more suggestions over the weekend, I’ll be sure to add them.

Monday Morning: I had a couple of additions to this list come in after I finished it, and wanted to add them. So we’re up to twelve.

  1. Al Martino, “Spanish Eyes” Birgit came up with this suggestion. There are lots of versions of this one, but Al’s is my favorite, the title track from his 1966 album. As a single, it reached #15 on the Hot 100, #16 on the Cash Box chart, #1 on the UK’s Adult Contemporary chart, and #5 on the UK Pop chart.
  2. Sir Mix-A-Lot, “Baby Got Back” Birgit goes from the sublime to the ridiculous with this one, which most people know as “I Like Big Butts.” Released in 1992 on his Mack Daddy album, the song was the #2 top-selling record (after Whitney Houston’s “I Will Always Love You”) of the year, despite being banned from MTV and radio stations everywhere for its rather blatantly sexist lyrics.
  3. Queen, “Fat Bottomed Girls” Arlee said that if I planned on playing the last one, I might as well play this one. From Queen’s 1978 Jazz album, it was the B side to “Bicycle Race.” It charted pretty well for a B side: #24 on the Hot 100, #18 on the Cash Box survey, #17 on Canada’s RPM Singles chart, and #11 in the UK.
  4. Stevie Nicks & Tom Petty, “Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around” Janet suggested this one, and I thought it was a Fleetwood Mac song until I went to find it. It was the first single from Stevie’s first solo album, 1981’s Bella Donna. Tom Petty and Mike Campbell wrote this originally for The Heartbreakers, and it’s the only song on the album not written or co-written by Nicks. It peaked at #3 in the US for six consecutive weeks, but only reached #50 in the UK.
  5. Pat Benatar, “Heartbreaker” Kip gave us this and the next three. This was the lovely Ms. Benatar’s first Top 40 single, reaching #23 in the US, #16 in Canada. It was from 1979’s In The Heat of The Night, her debut album.
  6. Original Cast, “Hair” I think Kip was worried I’d pull the version by The Cowsills out again, because he specifically said “Original Cast.” The show debuted off-Broadway in 1967 and on Broadway in 1968; hard to imagine it’s fifty years old…
  7. Foreigner, “Hot Blooded” From their second album, 1978’s Double Vision, the song reached #3 in the US and Canada and #42 in the UK that year.
  8. Chu Chu TV, “Head, Shoulders, Knees, and Toes” There are about eight bazillion versions of this kid’s song out there, and I must have chosen the strangest one to highlight here. Enjoy!
  9. Spinal Tap, “Big Bottom” I picked the next two, and with this one got into the backside game. Featured in the 1984 mockumentary film This Is Spinal Tap which starred Saturday Night Live’s Michael McKean, Christopher Guest, and Harry Shearer as everyone’s favorite heavy metal band. I trust that everyone has seen the movie, but if you didn’t, it’s hilarious.
  10. Cheech & Chong, “Earache, My Eye!” “Turn That Thing Down” by Alice Bowie (Cheech) is the song that the kid (Chong) plays when he gets up that has his father (Cheech again) so upset. A life study of parent-teen relationships in the Seventies, it’s from the duo’s 1974 Cheech & Chong’s Wedding Album, and reached #9 in July of that year.
  11. Journey, “Open Arms” Jeanne Owens recommended this one. From their 1981 album Escape, it’s their biggest Hot 100 hit, reaching #2 and staying there for six weeks, behind The J. Geils Band’s “Centerfold” and Joan Jett and The Blackhearts’ “I Love Rock & Roll,” in 1982.
  12. Rex Harison, “I’ve Grown Accustomed To Her Face” Uncle Jack came up with this one, from the Lerner & Loewe musical My Fair Lady. Rex Harrison, who played Professor Henry Higgins in the West End and Broadway musicals and in the 1964 film, doesn’t sing it so much as speak it, but it’s just as effective. Maybe more so.

And that’s Monday’s Music Moves Me for September 18, 2017.

Monday’s Music Moves Me is sponsored by X-Mas Dolly, Callie, Cathy, and Stacy, so be sure and visit them, where you can also find the Linky for the other participants.


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The Friday 5×2: Your “Dance Moves” Songs

Monday’s topic was “songs with dance moves in the title,” and I came up with a list of ten. You came up with more, although not quite ten, and I did some minor changes to some of the ones you came up with. Here’s this week’s list.

  1. The Beatles, “Twist & Shout” Several of you asked why I didn’t include this one. Honestly, I didn’t bother looking, because I was afraid I’d run into the problem I always run into, that Beatles songs posted to YouTube get taken down faster than you can say “BMG.” I could have used The Isley Brothers’ version, then I found this on The Fab Four’s “official” channel. From their first album, 1963’s Please Please Me in the UK, Introducing… The Beatles! in the US.
  2. Stray Cats, “Rock This Town” Birgit suggested this and the next two. This is the video I remember of this song. It was released in 1981 and reached #9 in both the US and UK.
  3. Stray Cats, “Stray Cat Strut” The followup single to “Rock This Town,” also from 1981. It reached #3 in the US and #11 in the UK.
  4. Louis Prima, “Jump, Jive & Wail” Birgit suggested The Brian Setzer Orchestra’s cover, but I figured that was too much Setzer, so I went with wild man Louis Prima here. The dark-haired woman standing in the background looking upset is his wife, Keely Smith. Theirs was not a happy relationship.
  5. Booker T. & The MG’s, “You Can’t Sit Down” A song that’s been covered by many, both instrumntal and vocal, which means you might see it in a future Battle of the Bands. Eugenia suggested this and the next.
  6. The Dovells, “Bristol Stomp” Eugenia suggested The Dovells’ version of “You Can’t Sit Down,” then I found this and decided to use it instead. Great doo-wop!
  7. Robert Lindsay, “The Lambeth Walk” The song is from the musical Me and My Girl, written in the late Thirties by Noel Gay (music) and Douglas Furber and L. Arthur Rose (lyrics). It had its first run in the West End in 1937 and was made into a movie called The Lambeth Walk a couple of years later, when the world was preparing for war (there are numerous videos out there of Nazi soldiers marching aound to this song). “Bristol Stomp” made me think of this.
  8. The Diamonds, “The Stroll” This was a popular dance in the late Fifties. It originated on American Bandstand, though this video is from Iowa (no idea where; the person who uploaded it said it was from Idaho).
  9. Bill Haley & The Comets, “Rock-A-Beatin’ Boogie” Had to put a song with some boogie in it. The film clip is from 1945’s Yolanda And The Thief, and Fred Astaire’s dance partner is Louise Bremer.
  10. Denver Airport Swing Dance Flash Mob Just looked like too much fun to pass on.

And that’s the Friday 5×2 for September 1, 2017. Have a good Labo(u)r Day weekend, if you’re headed out, if not, I’ll be here all weekend…

Monday’s Music Moves Me: Your Men’s Names Songs

I didn’t think we’d have enough suggestions, but this week you came up with ten song suggestions, one band suggestion, and I came up with a song for that band and one additional song that was suggested by an artist you named, so we have twelve big songs here for this week. Albums didn’t have that many songs in the old days, so you got a lot of music here.

  1. ABBA, “Chiquitita” Not sure if Chiquitita is a man’s name, but I’ll take Birgit’s word for it.
  2. Elton John, “Daniel” Dan said it was probably self-serving, but it was a classic by Sir Elton.
  3. Elton John, “Levon” Dan’s suggestion brought this one to mind. As I pointed out a while back, “Levon” is “Novel” spelled backward, but really, it’s a great song. I did “Bennie and the Jets” last week for Two for Tuesday, but that’s another one.
  4. Johnny Cash, “A Boy Named Sue” Uncle Jack came up with this, and I thought it was perfect. The first time I heard it, hearing the 1000 Hz tone that blotted out the (for 1968) mild profanity made me just about jump out of my skin. Now the term “son of a bitch” (Shel Silverstein’s original words) is no big deal. Maybe it should be, I don’t know.
  5. Dion, “Abraham, Martin, and John” Janet thought of the next three. This came out in 1968, shortly after Bobby Kennedy and Dr. Martin Luther King were assassinated, and I still get a lump in my throat when I hear it. Particularly now.
  6. Toni Basil, “Mickey” Janet also thought of this, and yes, it’s annoying, but it really sold a lot of records, reaching #1 worldwide in 1982. The song was written as “Kitty” by the Australian songwriting team of Mike Chapman and Nicky Chinn, sort of the Scott Aitken Waterman of the Seventies, and Ms. Basil changed it so she could sing it.
  7. Genesis, “Jesus He Knows Me” From the band’s 1991 album We Can’t Dance, it’s a satirical piece that was inspired by the financial hijinks of televangelists such as Jim Bakker, Robert Tilton, and Jimmy Swaggart. This is the uncensored version, so careful playing it at work or when the kiddies are listening.
  8. The Beatles, “Hey Jude” Joey suggested this, and though it was probably my least favorite Beatles song (though it’s okay up until the nah-nah-nahs) it was probably their biggest hit, certainly one of their last. The flip side was the rocker “Revolution.”
  9. Paul Revere & The Raiders, “Louie, Louie” Joey mentioned Paul Revere in ther comment, and I couldn’t find a song named that anywhere, so I improvised, assuming she meant Paul Revere the musician. It’s not clear whether The Kingsmen or Paul Revere & The Raiders recorded “Louie, Louie” first, but both bands recorded it in the same studio in Oregon.
  10. Herman’s Hermits, “I’m Henry the Eighth, I Am” Suggested by Mary B, this evidently was an old English music hall song, written by Fred Murray and R. P. Weston in 1910 and originally popularized by Harry Champion. When Herman and the boys recorded it in 1965, it became the fastest-selling record in history.
  11. Jimmy Dean, “Big Bad John” Another of those songs I heard a lot when I was a kid, also suggested by Mary. Jimmy’s probably better known for pork sausage now, but he was a hell of a singer in his day.
  12. Murray McLauchlan, “Me and Joey” Arlee gave us this one. Murray was born in Scotland and emigrated to Canada when he was five, living in a suburb of Toronto. He plays guitar, piano, and harmonica, and was the second singer-songwriter on True North Records, the first being Bruce Cockburn.

And that about wraps it up. That’s Monday’s Music Moves Me for August 21, 2017.

Monday’s Music Moves Me is sponsored by X-Mas Dolly, Callie, Cathy, and Stacy, so be sure and visit them, where you can also find the Linky for the other participants.


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